Peter Wagner, Executive Director
I need your help. For more than a decade, the Prison Policy Initiative has been at the forefront of the movement to expose how mass incarceration undermines our national welfare. With a lot of hard work and generous support from a small network of individual donors, we've won major civil rights victories in local governments, state legislatures and even the Supreme Court. But our long-term viability depends on people like you investing in our work.

Can you stand up for smart and effective justice policy by joining our small network of donors today? You can make a one-time gift, or even become one of our sustaining monthly donors.

Through the end of 2014, your contribution to our work will stretch twice as far thanks to a match commitment from a small group of other donors like you.

I thank you for your investment in our work towards a more just tomorrow.
—Peter
... (read more) (read less)

Prison Privatization

  • The Color of Corporate Corrections, Part II: Contractual Exemptions and the Overrepresentation of People of Color in Private Prisons, [PDF]
    Christopher Petrella, February, 2014
    “...this study finds that people of color are overrepresented in private minimum and/or medium security private facilities relative to their public counterparts in each of the nine (9) states examined.”
  • The Color of Corporate Corrections, part two: Contractual Exemptions and the Overrepresentation of People of Color in Private Prisons, [PDF]
    Radical Criminology, January, 2014
    “Health—and therefore age—tends to serve as a proxy for race without any explicit reference to it.”
  • Locked Up & Shipped Away: Interstate Prison Transfers and the Private Prison Industry, [PDF]
    Grassroots Leadership, November, 2013
    “Currently, prisoners in out-of-state private facilities are held approximately 450 miles to nearly 3,000 miles from their home states.”
  • Criminal: How Lockup Quotas and "Low-Crime Taxes" Guarantee Profits for Private Prison Corporations, [PDF]
    In the Public Interest, September, 2013
    “Essentially, the state would have to guarantee that its prison would be 90 percent filled for the next 20 years (a quota), or pay the company for unused prison beds if the number of inmates dipped below 90 percent capacity at any point...”
  • International Growth Trends in Prison Privatization [PDF]
    Sentencing Project, August, 2013
    “Prison privatization is most concentrated and most fully privatized in a handful of predominantly English-speaking countries. These include Australia, Scotland, England and Wales, New Zealand, South Africa, and the United States.”
  • Roadblocks to Reform Perils for Georgia's Criminal Justice System, [PDF]
    Southern Center for Human Rights, November, 2012
    “The traits endemic in private prisons – poorly trained staff, inadequate services, higher rates of violence and other infractions – dovetail with one another and are mutually reinforcing.”
  • Lake Erie Correctional Institution Full Internal Management Audit [PDF]
    Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction, September, 2012
    “Employees interviewed could not demonstrate the following: a knowledge of the local fire plan; a knowledge of the rapid release of inmates from cells in locked areas [...] and many simply stated they had no idea what they should do.”
  • Collateral Consequences of Interstate Transfer of Prisoners [PDF]
    Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice, July, 2012
    “In addition to breaches in facility security, out-of-state private prisons create significant barriers to rehabilitation and humane conditions of care.”
  • Dollars and Detainees The Growth of For-Profit Detention, [PDF]
    Sentencing Project, July, 2012
    “Between 2002-2010 [...] privately-held ICE and U.S. Marshals Service detainees increased by 206% and 322%, respectively. In contrast there was respective growth of 28% and 67% in the number of state and federal prisoners held in private facilities.”
  • Prison Bed Profiteers How Corporations Are Reshaping Criminal Justice in the U.S., [PDF]
    National Council on Crime and Delinquency, May, 2012
    “Prison industry lobbyists seek to impact sentencing policies as well as the rules and regulations included in government contracts. In 2010, CCA, GEO, and Cornell Companies together spent more than $1.5 million on federal lobbying.”
  • Pitfalls and Promises The Real Risks to Residents and Taxpayers of Privatizing Prisons and Prison Services in Michigan, [PDF]
    Michigan Corrections Organization, February, 2012
    “Taxpayers want to save money. Private prisons want to make money. These are inherently opposite interests, since the only way for private prisons to make money is for the government to give it to them. The drive for growth can be counterproductive...”
  • Private Prisons: The Public's Problem, [PDF]
    American Friends Service Committee, February, 2012
    “Between 2008 and 2010, Arizona overpaid for its private prisons by about $10 million. If the requested 2,000 medium security private prison beds are built, Arizona taxpayers can expect to waste at least $6 million on privatization every year.”
  • Too Good to be True Private Prisons in America, [PDF]
    The Sentencing Project, January, 2012
    “The available data belies the oft-claimed economic benefits of private contracting, and points to the practice being an unreliable approach toward financial stability.”
  • Too Good to be True Private Prisons in America, [PDF]
    Sentencing Project, January, 2012
    “Finally, private prison companies' dependence on ensuring a large prison population to maintain profits provides inappropriate incentives to lobby government officials for policies that will place more people in prison.”
  • Gaming the System: How the Political Strategies of Private Prison Companies [PDF]
    Justice Policy Institute, June, 2011
    “While private prison companies may try to present themselves as just meeting existing”
  • FY 2010 Operating Per Capita Cost Report Cost Identification and Comparison of State and Private Contract Beds, [PDF]
    ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS, April, 2011
    “An inmate health care cost factor is identified and deducted due to the limitations imposed by the private contractors [...][because] unlike the private contractors, the ADC is required to provide medical and mental health services to inmates [...].”
  • Banking on Bondage Private Prisons and Mass Incarceration, [PDF]
    ACLU, 2011
    (The evidence that private prisons provide savings compared to publicly operated facilities is highly questionable, and certain studies point to worse conditions in for-profit facilities.)
  • Department of Corrections-Prison Population Growth A Report to the Arizona Legislature, [PDF]
    State of Arizona Office of the Auditor General, September, 2010
    “The State paid more per inmate in private prisons that for equivalent services in state facilities.”
  • Corrections Department: Review of Facility Planning Efforts and Oversight of Private Prisons and Health Programs, [PDF]
    Legislative Finance Committee (New Mexico), May, 2007
    “Nationally, New Mexico places the highest percentage, about 42-44 percent, of inmates in private prisons. The national average is 6.5 percent.”
  • Department of Corrections: It Needs to Better Ensure Against Conflicts of Interest and to Improve Its Inmate Population Projections, [PDF]
    California State Auditor - Bureau of State Audits, September, 2005
    (The report found conflict-of-interest problems in no-bid contracts for re-opening prisons. The decision to re-open the facilities, were in turn based on population calculations that were not made through statistically valid forecasting methods.)
  • Cost-Saving or Cost-Shifting: The Fiscal Impact of Prison Privatization in Arizona, [PDF]
    Private Corrections Institute, February, 2005
  • Corrections Corporation of America: A Critical Look at the First 20 Years, Grassroots Leadership, [PDF]
    Grassroots Leadership, December, 2003
    “explores continuing operational and financial problems; questions CCA's long-term viability as states reassess prison policies”
  • Private Prisons and Public Money Hidden Costs Borne by Colorado's Taxpayers, [PDF]
    Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition, September, 2002
  • A Contributing Influence: The Private-Prison Industry and Political Giving in the South, [PDF]
    Institute on Money in State Politics, April, 2002
  • Weighing the Watchmen: Evaluating the Costs and Benefits of Outsourcing Correctional Services,
    Reason Public Policy Institute, January, 2002
  • Prison Privatization and the Use of Incarceration [PDF]
    Sentencing Project, January, 2002
    (Updated in 9/2004)
  • Jail Breaks: Economic Development Subsidies Given to Private Prisons, [PDF]
    Good Jobs First, October, 2001
  • Selective Celling: Inmate Population in Ohio's Private Prisons, [PDF]
    Policy Matters Ohio, May, 2001
    (argues that prison cost savings are a myth by sending only low-cost prisoners to private prisons)
  • Emerging Issues on Privatized Prisons [PDF]
    Bureau of Justice Assistance, February, 2001
  • The Prison Payoff: The Role of Politics and Private Prisons in the Incarceration Boom,
    Western States Center and Western Prison Project, November, 2000
  • Private Prisons, Politics & Profits
    National Institute on Money in State Politics, July, 2000
  • Private Adult Correctional Facilities Fines, Failures and Dubious Practices,
    Ontario Public Service Employees Union, April, 2000
  • The Private Prison Research Site [Website]
    Charles H. Logan, University of Connecticut, 2000
    (Author: Private Prisons: Cons and Pros)
  • The evidence is clear: Crime Shouldn't Pay
    AFSCME Corrections United, 2000
  • Inspection and Review of the Northeast Ohio Corr. Center
    Office of the Corrections Trustee, District of Columbia, November, 1998
  • Private Prisons in the United States An Assessment of Current Practice, [PDF]
    Abt Associaties, July, 1998
  • Should Crime Pay? A review of the evidence,
    AFSCME Corrections United, 1998
  • Private and Public Prisons: Private and Public Prisons: Studies Comparing Operational Costs and/or Quality of Service, [PDF]
    General Accounting Office, August, 1996
  • The Private Sector and Prison Industries [PDF]
    National Institute of Justice, August, 1985
    “As of January 1985, there were 26 projects in which the private sector was involved with State-level prison industries. There has been a gradual growth [...] until 1980, when a marked increase occurred at a rate that continues to grow today.”

Pages Updated On: 18-Sep-2014 - 13:33:55
Links Engine 2.0 By: Gossamer Threads Inc.