Peter Wagner, Executive Director
I need your help. For more than a decade, the Prison Policy Initiative has been at the forefront of the movement to expose how mass incarceration undermines our national welfare. With a lot of hard work and generous support from a small network of individual donors, we've won major civil rights victories in local governments, state legislatures and even the Supreme Court. But our long-term viability depends on people like you investing in our work.

Can you stand up for smart and effective justice policy by joining our small network of donors today? You can make a one-time gift, or even become one of our sustaining monthly donors.

Through the end of 2014, your contribution to our work will stretch twice as far thanks to a match commitment from a small group of other donors like you.

I thank you for your investment in our work towards a more just tomorrow.
—Peter
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Research Clearinghouse:

This page contains links to virtually all the empirical criminal justice research available online, organized by category and publication date. If you know what you are looking for, you may also search the database. We also have an email newsletter (at right) for new clearinghouse updates.


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Some of the most recently added reports are:

Wednesday, October 22 2014:

  • South Bronx Community Connections Technical Report, [PDF] John Jay College of Criminal Justice. November, 2013. "By fall 2013, two years into project implementation, a statistical analysis of SBCC’s available data (see Appendix A) found juvenile project participants to be suggestively, but significantly (p value= 0.09), less likely to be re-arrested within a year."
  • The Unpredictability of Murder: Juvenile Homicide in the Pathways to Desistance Study, [PDF] Youth Violence and Juvenile Justice. October, 2014. (Results from a rare-events logistic regression that examined the relationship between these five risk factors and their ability to distinguish between the two groups indicate that only lower IQ and a greater exposure to violence were significant.)
  • The Crime Beat: Does Quantity Matter? [PDF] John Jay College of Criminal Justice Center on Media, Crime and Justice. October, 2014. "We found that the six papers under review averaged about 78 crime-related stories for the period studied, with the most stories appearing in The Camden Courier-Post (165) and the fewest in the Naperville Sun (26)."
  • Skewed Justice: Citizens United, Television Advertising and State Supreme Court Justices' Decisions in Criminal Cases, Emory Law School; American Constitution Society. October, 2014. "In a state with 10,000 ads, a doubling of airings is associated on average with an 8 percent increase in justices’ voting against a criminal defendant’s appeal."

Tuesday, October 21 2014:

  • Explaining Dimensions of State-Level Punitiveness in the United States: The Roles of Social, Economic, and Cultural Factors, [PDF] Baker Institute of Public Policy. August, 2014. (For incarceration, citizen engagement and property crime have a statistically significant and negative impact on state punitiveness, while the percent of population that is black has a significant and positive effect.)

Friday, October 17 2014:

  • Video Visitation: How Private Companies Push for Visits by Video and Families Pay the Price, [PDF] Grassroots Leadership; Texas Criminal Justice Coalition. October, 2014. "Video-only visitation policies strip away that choice; they are simply another outgrowth of the idea that offering services to prisoners and their families can be commercialized."
  • Prison Visitation Policies: A Fifty State Survey, Chesa Boudin, Trevor Stutz, & Aaron Littman. February, 2014. "This paper presents a summary of the findings from the first fifty-state survey of prison visitation policies."

Tuesday, October 14 2014:

  • Florida's Aging Prisoner Problem [PDF] Florida Tax Watch. September, 2014. "Between 2000 and 2014, the elderly prison population grew from 5,605 to 21,002, at an average increase of 9.9 percent per year, a rate more than three times higher than the general prison population."
  • Black, Brown and Targeted: A report on Boston Police Department Street Encounters from 2007-2010, [PDF] ACLU of Massachusetts. October, 2014. (Most alarmingly, the analysis found that Blacks were subjected to 63% of these encounters, even though they made up just 24% of Boston's population. The analysis also showed that crime does not explain this racial disparity.)
  • An Overview of Public Opinion and Discourse on Criminal Justice Issues [PDF] The Opportunity Agenda. August, 2014. (Since the 1990s, people are backing away from harsh enforcement and sentencing policies, such as mandatory sentencing, and appear more interested in allocating tax dollars toward rehabilitation, treatment, and support efforts.)

Friday, October 10 2014:

  • Mortality in Local Jails and State Prisons, 2000-2012 - Statistical Tables [PDF] Bureau of Justice Statistics. October, 2014. "In 2012, 4,309 inmates died while in the custody of local jails or state prisons-an increase of 2% (67 deaths) from 2011. The number of deaths in local jails increased, from 889 in 2011 to 958 in 2012, which marked the first increase since 2009."

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