Massachusetts removes major roadblock to re-entry: unnecessary license suspensions

Massachusetts Governor Charlie Baker signed into law a bill to end license suspensions for people convicted of drug offenses unrelated to road safety, eliminating a major barrier toward successful re-entry.

by Alison Walsh, March 30, 2016

Today in Massachusetts, Governor Charlie Baker signed into law a bill to end driver’s license suspensions for people convicted of drug offenses unrelated to road safety. With the passage of this bill, Massachusetts eliminates a 27-year-old law requiring automatic suspensions, plus a reinstatement fee of $500, for anyone found guilty of a drug offense.

In a statement, Governor Baker acknowledged that access to transportation is critical for people seeking to find gainful employment and fulfill family obligations.

While the new law will not bring relief to people convicted of drug trafficking, others convicted of less serious drug offenses will see their licenses returned within 30 days.



Tweet this page Follow @PrisonPolicy on Twitter Donate

Stay Informed

Get the latest updates by signing up for our newsletters:


And our specialty lists:







Events

  • Feb 21, 2019:
    Volunteer Attorney Stephen Raher will be presenting his paper “The Company Store and the Literally Captive Market: Consumer Law in Prisons and Jails” at the Consumer Law Conference at Berkeley Law School. The paper will be presented and discussed at 4:00pm.

Not near you?
Invite us to your city, college or organization.