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Chart comparing the portion of the probation population making less than $20,000 per year, $20,000 to $49,999 per year, and $50,000 or more per year to the portion of the population that was not recently on probation. Most notable is that two-thirds of the probation population has an annual income below $20,000, compared to just 40% of the non-probation population.

Data Source: U.S. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration's (SAMHSA's) National Survey on Drug Use and Health 2-year RDAS (2016-2017) "Crosstab Creator". (Graph: Wendy Sawyer, 2019)

This graph originally appeared in New data: Low incomes - but high fees - for people on probation.

People on probation are much more likely to be low-income than those who aren’t on probation, and steep monthly probation fees often put them at risk of being jailed when they can’t pay.

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