Stand up for justice
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The first $2,500 we raise through Tuesday, May 2 will be matched by a generous donor as part of the “Valley Gives Day” challenge. Can you stand up for smart and effective criminal justice policy with a gift today?.

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P.S. If we meet our goal, the Community Foundation of Western Massachusetts will enter us into a drawing to have all of your gifts matched a second time!

Research Clearinghouse:

Beyond producing original research, the Prison Policy Initiative edits several databases to empower activists, journalists, and policymakers to shape effective criminal justice policy. This page contains links to virtually all the empirical criminal justice research available online, organized by category and publication date. If you know what you are looking for, you may also search the database. We also have an email newsletter (at right) for new research clearinghouse updates.


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Some of the most recently added reports are:

Friday, April 28 2017:

  • Gender and Trauma, Somatic Interventions for Girls in Juvenile Justice: Implications for Policy and Practice, [PDF] Rebecca Epstein and Thalia González, Georgetown Law Center on Poverty and Inequality. April, 2017. "Trauma-informed, gender-responsive, and culturally competent somatic interventions can serve as a critical component of physical and mental health approaches for system-involved girls."

Wednesday, April 26 2017:

  • Designed to Break You: Human Rights Violations on Texas' Death Row, [PDF] Human Rights Clinic at the University of Texas School of Law. 2015. "Every individual on Texas’ death row thus spends approximately 23 hours a day in complete isolation for the entire duration of their sentence, which, on average, lasts more than a decade."
  • The Voting Rights of Ex-Felons and Election Outcomes in the United States [PDF] Tilman Klumpp, Hugo Mialon, Michael Williams. March, 2017. "The changes in felony disenfranchisement laws examined are evidence of a growing consensus that lifelong voting bans are not only ethically problematic, but also stand in the way of efforts to reduce recidivism."

Tuesday, April 25 2017:

  • Locked Up and Locked Down: Segregation of Inmates with Mental Illness, [PDF] Anna Guy, Amplifying Voices of Inmates with Disabilities Prison Project. September, 2016. "[Protection and Advocacy Agencies] have received countless reports of abuse and neglect of inmates in segregation, including prolonged isolation, deplorable conditions, inadequate care, increased self-harm and suicide attempts, and even death."
  • Lethally Deficient: Direct Appeals in Texas Death Penalty Cases, [PDF] Texas Defender Service. 2016. "Review by the U.S. Supreme Court was not sought in 34.6% of the cases surveyed, meaning that defense lawyers waived the first opportunity for federal review in more than a third of Texas death penalty cases decided on direct appeal between 2009 and 2015."
  • How much do incarcerated people earn in each state? [Website] Wendy Sawyer, Prison Policy Initiative. April, 2017. "[P]risons appear to be paying incarcerated people less today than they were in 2001. The average of the minimum daily wages paid to incarcerated workers for non-industry prison jobs is now 87 cents, down from 93 cents reported in 2001."
  • The steep cost of medical co-pays in prison puts health at risk [Website] Wendy Sawyer, Prison Policy Initiative. April, 2017. "In Michigan, it would take over a week to earn enough for a single $5 co-pay, making it the free world equivalent of over $300. In 13 states co-pays are equivalent to charging minimum wage workers more than $200."
  • "If They Hand You a Paper, You Sign It": A Call to End the Sterilization of Women in Prison, [PDF] Rachel Roth and Sara L. Ainsworth, Hastings Women's Law Journal. January, 2015. "[A] number of states allow the sterilization of incarcerated women—flouting important policy norms—and that medical providers and their professional organizations play key roles in sanctioning and carrying out these procedures."
  • Obstructing Justice: Prisons as Barriers to Medical Care for Pregnant Women, [PDF] Rachel Roth, UCLA Women's Law Journal. August, 2010. "Jail and prison staff appear unprepared for pregnancy-related emergencies, and their dismissive attitudes toward pregnant women who say they need medical attention only increase the likelihood of delaying and denying care."

Wednesday, April 19 2017:

  • A Wealth of Inequalities: Mass Incarceration, Employment, and Racial Disparities in U.S. Household Wealth, 1996 to 2011, [PDF] Bryan L. Sykes, University of Washington and Michelle Maroto, University of Alberta. October, 2016. "[A] non-Hispanic white household with an institutionalized member would actually hold more in assets than an otherwise similar black or Hispanic household without an institutionalized member."
  • The Dose-Response of Time Served in Prison on Mortality: New York State, 1989-2003, [Website] Evelyn J. Patterson, University of Vanderbilt. March, 2013. "After controlling for a variety of demographic and offense-related factors...each year in prison increased the odds of death by 15.6% in this 1989 to 1993 parole cohort...an increased odds of death of 78% for somebody who spent 5 years in prison."
  • "She Doesn't Deserve to be Treated Like This": Prisons as Sites of Reproductive Injustice, [PDF] Rachel Roth, Center for Women Policy Studies. July, 2012. "[T]he well-established nature of women’s rights has not stopped prison and jail personnel from trying to deny women abortion care, or at least obstruct women’s access to abortion."

Tuesday, April 18 2017:

  • "Not in it for Justice": How California's Pretrial Detention and Bail System Unfairly Punishes Poor People, [PDF] Human Rights Watch. April, 2017. "In six California counties examined in detail in this report, the total cost of jailing people whom the prosecutor never charged or who had charges dropped or dismissed was $37.5 million over two years."
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